6 – on – Saturday 27.06.20

Hot, hot, hot. I’m not complaining, but it does keep me indoors if it gets much above 23 or 24 degrees. As always, we’ve been enjoying the garden, digging after the heavy rain of a week or so ago means we now have a better flower bed and have made inroads into the permanent veg bed at the back. The veg are loving it in the front garden, but we feel the need to keep it scrupulously tidy. It’s like a Britain’s garden! (Those of you of more mature years will remember what a Britain’s garden is, and maybe their farm, and their zoo…). Any way, on with the 6:

First up, above. Good old Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’. It’s huge and is just coming into flower. It’s in a good spot in the herbaceous bed and so it will stay there. I might thin it out a bit.

Second, and quite exciting, is this Acanthus flower. I’ve been hoping it would flower and here it is, with a second spike just out of the picture. This show of floriferousness (is that a word?) has saved its bacon. Without a flower I would be digging it out in the autumn, as it is I shall leave this to be stately at the back of the border, and dig out the two or three others that have spread from it. There’s a lot of Solidago behind it – that will be allowed to flower this year and then rrrripppp – it’s coming out. There’s masses of it, as you can see.

Three is this very bright Penstemon. I have no idea what it’s called. It was very overgrown when we arrived last August and earlier this year I cut it down to the ground and removed a horrible hypericum that was growing all over it. It’s the only Penstemon in the garden, and I must get some more. Something a little less….brash.

Phygelius capensis. It’s lovely now and through til July/August time. Those scarlet bells have a custard yellow edge on the interior – you can only see it if you turn the flowers up to look. I wasn’t sure how to deal with it this year, but now I know to cut it down to the ground in February/March time. It’s a bit straggly so I’m hoping it will bush itself up a bit if I prune it and give it a good feed in due course.

I love this stuff. It pops up all over the lawn after a spell of rain. It’s called ‘self-heal’ (Prunella vulgaris). You can eat it in salad or make tea with it. Apparently its good for upset stomachs and mouth ulcers. That’s not a recommendation, by the way.

Last are these lovely bright geraniums. I can’t resist them when I go to the nursery. We have a little sun trap at the front of the house and I’m trying to make it look like a mediterranean terrace. These are part of the first stage. They’re in a group of pots with yucca and cordyline. In the sun they are a joyful sight.

That’s my 6 for this week. If you enjoy my 6 on Saturday you might like my wildlife/countryside blog too.  It’s accessible from the Core Edge Journal tab at the top of the blog.  Also on the In the Garden tab the June overview of the garden will be posted after the weekend, so take a look there too.

Readers who are new to 6 – on – Saturday can join in easily – If you want to get a glimpse of lovely gardens from across the world, and chat to lots of lovely gardeners, then go here https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/  and join in!

6 – on – Saturday 30.05.20

Hello. Hope you’re all ok, safe and well. Another week of shouting at the telly, cursing our politicians and feeling powerless. A hot one here in Devon, no rain, soil like powder, hosepipe working overtime. Can’t be long before we get a hosepipe ban. All very cheery. Not. But the flowers are lovely and the garden is, as always, my saving grace. Here are my 6 for this week anyway:

First up is this Hosta. It’s Prince of Wales and seems to be enjoying being in the sun. Later in the day it will be in dappled shade, so it shouldn’t completely fry.

Next are two lovelies that I have posted before at this time every year, but not from this garden. Right, of course, is Gertrude Jekyll, left is Munstead Wood. These are two of the David Austen roses I bought by mail order earlier in the year. They are covered in blooms. The Munstead Wood is lax as always, so that is MrOG’s hand just lifting its head. I must put some supports in. To be honest, I didn’t expect so many blooms this first year.

I’m not sure if you can see this very well, but it’s a Fuschia that is at the bottom of our front path. I didn’t prune it earlier in the year and now it has just gone wild. I love the reddish foliage and it’s a mass of these slender blooms. I’m not sure of the variety but I shall definitely be keeping this.

This is actually quite a small flower. I think it’s Campanula poscharskyana – a bit of a mouthful. Now I’ve been cursing this plant all spring, as it grows in low, leafy mounds, it’s quite invasive and there’s masses of it in the garden. I’ve been pulling these soft green mounds out left, right and centre. And then suddenly, it put out longish stems and all along them are these lavender blue starry flowers. I forgive it, completely. Although, I still think I’ll pull quite a lot out later on.

I couldn’t resist putting this in close-up. Last week, this was in the picture of the haul from the garden centre. It is Geum ‘Scarlet Tempest’ and is just a delight in the sun. Almost double-flowered, that lovely apricot-tinged red, and powdery yellow stamens. Buy one.

Last up is a wildflower. In fact, it’s two wildflowers. The main bloom is purple toadflax which seems to like our soil and is waving those lovely tiny snapdragon blooms in various parts of the garden. Photobombing it down in the left hand bottom corner is Torquay Pride – centranthus. I’m happy to have both of them in the garden.

That’s my 6 for this week.  No matter how nice the weekend weather – stay near home, keep safe, slap on the sun protection.  In England we still have pandemic conditions and you need to be careful, my friends. Remember – 2 metres.

If you enjoy my 6 on Saturday you might like my wildlife/countryside blog too.  It’s accessible from the Core Edge Journal tab at the top of the blog.  Also on the In the Garden tab the May overview of the garden will be posted after the weekend, so take a look there too.

Readers who are new to 6 – on – Saturday can join in easily – If you want to get a glimpse of lovely gardens from across the world, and chat to lots of lovely gardeners, then go here https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/  and join in!

6 – on – Saturday 23.05.20

WordPress has finally forced me to use the new editing tool, so bear with me if this looks a bit weird. I haven’t mastered it yet. And it’s making me swear. A lot.

I’m really not grumbling about the run of sunny weather, but Lord knows, we could do with a good dollop of rain. The soil is powder dry here and planting requires a pick-axe to break through the surface and get anywhere near a planting hole. Nevertheless, gardening is taking place. Even better, our nearby good garden centre has re-opened so of course, we have been tempted out. Gloves and mask are the order of the day when buying and there has definitely not been any browsing. Any way, on with the 6.

First are these irises. I think I showed you one last week – here are a few more. There are white ones too, but I can’t work out how to get two pictures side by side, although I seem to have found out how to cut the corners off….

Second up are the purchases from the garden centre awaiting placement. Some of my good old favourites here – 3 pots of erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’and 1 of ‘Winter Orchid’ (I think, it has lost its label), 2 hardy geraniums – ‘Rozanne’ and geranium sanguineum ‘New Hampshire Purple’, a lovely geum called ‘Scarlet Tempest’, and a shedload of antirrhinum, red and white. Now, where’s that pick-axe.

Number 3 is a hardy geranium just coming into flower in the border. I think it is ‘Ann Folkard’. There’s lots of it so plenty of scope for increasing it around the garden. I do love hardy geraniums, they’re such good value and I’m delighted to see them popping up in various places.

Next up is – guess what? Geum ‘Totally Tangerine’. How can you have an herbaceous border without it? It’s a marvel. Starts flowering now and doesn’t really stop, increases size pretty quickly and splits easily. What could be better?

Number 5 is this lovely thing. It’s coming up randomly in the garden in ones and twos and provides a fabulous pop of colour. It is gladiolus communis byzantinus, commonly called ‘Whistling Jacks’ in parts of the far southwest, where it has naturalised. I love it, and plan to buy lots more with my spring bulb order.

And finally, here’s a little update on the veg patch. Parsnips and carrots up nicely at the back, lettuce and spring onions just showing next, beetroot doing well in the middle. Then a patch of leeks, a couple of courgettes and the runners which are finally making progress. Growing vegetables always takes so long. I feel sorry for all those people who rushed out and bought seeds thinking they were going to feed themselves. Growing veg from seed is a looooong game.

That’s my 6 for this week.  No matter how nice the Bank Holiday weather – stay near home, keep safe.  

If you enjoy my 6 on Saturday you might like my wildlife/countryside blog too.  It’s accessible from the Core Edge Journal tab at the top of the blog.  Also on the In the Garden tab is the April overview of the garden, so take a look there too.

Readers who are new to 6 – on – Saturday can join in easily – If you want to get a glimpse of lovely gardens from across the world, and chat to lots of lovely gardeners, then go here https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/  and join in!

6 – on – Saturday 09.04.20

Here we are again.  Another week of lockdown gone by, another week of glorious gardening.  Another week of wondering if we’ll all have agoraphobia when the time comes… Once again, the garden saves me from dwelling too much on the more unpleasant side of things, although if any of you follow me on Twitter (on my ‘other’ account @ProfJuneG, not @Optimistgarden) then you will be all too aware how I rage about ‘the situation’.  So, the garden, god bless it, is my refuge.  Here are my six:

First up is the apple tree.  After 2 years in the pot at the old house and 8 months here, this week it finally got put in the ground.  Cause for great celebration.  It’s a little bit wonky – Mr OG suggested it should have been lined up against the fencepost – but it’s totally fine right where it is, I say the fence post is leaning.  It had lots of blossom so I hope we get some apples.  It’s surrounded by the dreaded Japanese anemone but we did clear out a space for it.  Behind it is Nerine foliage.

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Remember those 36 tiny geranium plants from a while back?  This is them planted out.  They’re still pretty small but some of them are flowering and I’m hopeful of a reasonable show later on, and a very good show next year.

Third pic is this aquilegia.  Normally they irritate me in all their tedious self-set dark purpleness, but this one is a rather delicate lavender.  We also have quite a lot of white ones, so perhaps we will see repeats of this lovely colour.

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Next are these fabulous poppies.  It’s not a great picture, I’m afraid.  There are lots of them, all over this part of the garden, all of them look as though they are this wonderful scarlet.  I think they are ‘Beauty of Livermere’ but they have no label.  Each flower head is a good 7 or 8 inches across, they are huge and so heavy they can barely hold themselves up.  I love them.

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This week’s penultimate picture is the weigela hedge.  Just coming into flower, it’s about ten feet high and screens the shed.  I think it’s ‘Bristol Ruby.’  It’s in the back garden which is a bit of a shame because we only see it in passing.  The only windows that overlook are two frosted bathroom windows and the spare room.

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And finally, is this weird lantern-type flower.  I noticed it growing through our overgrown front shrub border – starved of light, quite spindly, probably too tall, and over a week or so these clusters of red flowers appeared.   A mystery to me,  I had to resort to looking it up on the internet – googling ‘drooping red lantern flowers’.  It is, I’m pretty sure, a Crinodendron hookerianum.  Try saying that after a few drinks.  I’m going to try and rescue it, so that it is more visible.

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And that friends, is it for this week.  No matter how nice the weather – stay home, keep safe.  I think we still have a long way to go.

If you enjoy my 6 on Saturday you might like my wildlife/countryside blog too.  It’s accessible from the Core Edge Journal tab at the top of the blog.  Also on the In the Garden tab is the April overview of the garden, so take a look there too.

Readers who are new to 6 – on – Saturday can join in easily – If you want to get a glimpse of lovely gardens from across the world, and chat to lots of lovely gardeners, then go here https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/  and join in!

The O.G.

6 – on – Saturday 25.04.20

In spite of life being quite strange at the moment the year seems to be hurrying by.  Here we are, almost at the end of April and at the end of another week of good weather. The concentration this week has been on getting the veg sorted and we’ve made good progress.  I hope you are all well and not finding things too tedious – thank goodness for the garden, eh?  Here are mine for this week.

Number One – last week you had the lovely pink tree peony, this week it’s the more usual yellow one.  It’s right at the bottom of the garden where it gets all the wind and weather and isn’t a bit sheltered.  It seems to be doing ok for now.  I like it less than the pink but the foliage is nice and bright.

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Next are the veg. Three in one for you. We’ve planted parsnips, carrots, lettuce, spring onions, peas, runner beans and courgettes.  Only the radishes and beans are showing anything worth showing you.  No parsnips yet, the carrots are teeny tiny, and there is one pea – it may be the only one as they were old seeds, but I’ll let you know!  Anyway, here are the radishes (French Breakfast) and the runners (from a bag of loose beans from last year and I can’t remember what they are) before they went, and in.  I haven’t been able to get beanstalks so Mr OG improvised from some willow canes and prunings.

At the halfway mark is this shrub doing its rather beautiful thing at our front gate.  I don’t know what it is.  Can any one enlighten me?  It’s rounded in habit, small leaf, and masses of these small white flowers in flattish-headed clusters.  It has no scent.  It looks lovely, especially in bright sunlight.

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This is the red maple/acer, now the tallest tree in the garden.  The developing leaves are complemented by this mass of tiny yellow blooms.  It’s not a very good picture as I was lying on a sun-lounger at the time, and couldn’t be bothered to get up!!

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Next up is a weed.  When this first started appearing I thought it was bindweed and my heart sank.  On closer inspection, it’s got these wrinkly leaves, and they’re very shiny.  It has exactly the same habit as bindweed – long curling shoots winding their way through plants, but it is (fortunately) less vigorous and easy to pull up.  After some investigation online (Plantnet) I can identify it as black bryony.  Apparently it has interesting berries in the autumn/winter.  I’m afraid it’s not going to live that long.IMG_1434

Last week I gave you the beautiful Estella Rijnveldt tulip, this week it is my absolute favourite – Angelique.  We planted these last autumn when we had done no work in the garden so that we could be sure of a few blooms to look at.  Short of tubs we overplanted this one and the blooms are a little smaller than they should be, but still beautiful.  So soft, and that delicate mix of creamy white and pink makes Angelique a must-have.

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So that’s my 6 for this week. Look forward to seeing all yours.  Stay at home, stay 2m away if you can’t stay at home, and stay safe.

If you enjoy my 6 on Saturday you might like my wildlife/countryside blog too.  It’s accessible from the Core Edge Journal tab at the top of the blog.

Readers who are new to 6 – on – Saturday can join in easily – If you want to get a glimpse of lovely gardens from across the world, and chat to lots of lovely gardeners, then go here https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/  and join in!

The O.G.

6 – on – Saturday 18th April 2020

Another week of good weather – until today when we had some very welcome rain here in the south west.  Life goes on, thank goodness, albeit a constrained and quieter life than we are normally used to.  Some seeds are in – and up – some have failed, I blame the lack of seed compost rather than any clumsiness on my part.  The conservatory is standing in as a greenhouse and doing a good job of it.  The window sills are full of runner beans and courgettes, plus those 36 geraniums I was potting up the other week.  Incidentally, they’re doing very well.  Anyhow, enough rambling, time for my 6:

Up first is apple blossom. I love that pink and white together with the fresh green of the leaves.  Looking forward to a few apples later on, there is much more blossom than last year.P1000299

Remember the dead tree where I was planning to plant a rambler to, er, ramble up it?  Here is said rambler in place.  It is ‘Albertine’, flowers in June, the most lovely apricot buds opening to pink and a strong scent.  Something else to look forward to.  Seems quite hard to see in this picture, well camouflaged by all the other greenery!  I promise, it’s there.

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Number 3 is this beautiful, blowsy bloom.  A tree peony, although I’ve no idea which one.  This is the only open bloom so far but there are lots of others fattening up.  Never had tree peonies in the garden before and I’m very pleased to have found this one waiting for us!  That dark red foliage is a perfect partner.

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Next is this clump of cheerful daisies, argyranthemum frutescens I think.  They are beautiful at the moment and when I can, I shall buy more to dot about.  They are like a lamp in the border.

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And 5th for this week is a favourite of mine.  Centranthus ruber or red valerian, or ‘Torquay Pride’ as they call it in these parts.  Some would say it’s a weed, but I love it’s reliability, the fact that it is free and long flowering and that it just crops up everywhere.  This is growing nonchalantly at the base of the shrub border.  It’s in full sun on top of a low wall and clearly loves it.

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Last of all is the first of the tulips to flower.  An heirloom parrot (obviously) rejoicing in the name of ‘Estella Rjynveldt’.  I love it, it’s so flamboyant and makes a great cut flower.  Ageing gracefully to fully-open drooping petals, a vase full is like having a Dutch old master still-life in the sitting room.

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So that’s my 6 for this week. Look forward to seeing all yours.  Stay at home, stay 2m away if you can’t stay at home, and stay safe.  Á bientôt!

If you enjoy my 6 on Saturday you might like my wildlife/countryside blog too.  It’s accessible from the Core Edge Journal tab at the top of the blog.

Readers who are new to 6 – on – Saturday can join in easily – If you want to get a glimpse of lovely gardens from across the world, and chat to lots of lovely gardeners, then go here https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/  and join in!!

The O.G.

6 – on – Saturday 11.04.20

Happy Easter you lovely people.  I hope you are all well and able to enjoy some sort of garden and gardening.  The season has certainly turned here in the south west of England, cloudless skies and really warm.  In spite of everything else, it feels good.  The garden is really moving along now and here are my 6 for this week:

Cherry blossom.  I’ve no idea what flavour it is, but it’s quite a mature tree and this blossom appeared almost overnight.  Tight little buds for a few days and then, boing! all this blossom.  So pretty.

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Next is this patch of yellow Archangel.  I’ve always loved these, ever since I was a girl and we used to see them in the hedgerows.  So bright, so nettle-like, and yet so un-nettle-like.P1000282

Third today is this pretty little Oxalis.  To be honest it’s a bit of a nuisance, seeds everywhere, but here, against the front wall, covering up the later Nerine foliage, I really like it.

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Number 4 is a pot full of Muscari.  I know I keep posting these, but I love their little shaggy blue hats and next year I’m going to grow hundreds of them.

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Fifth are the first of our tulips to flower.  I don’t know what they are, they appeared unannounced in one of the old rose beds, so we left them alone to see what they were.  As you can see, they are lipstick red with a black centre.  They will have to be moved from where they are, but I shall keep them.

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And last of all, say hello to these little guys.  A bit faded from the winter, but most definitely… The Boys Are Back In Town.

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That’s my 6 for this week.  Hope you are all keeping well.  And remember – Wash Your Hands.  Practise Social Distancing.  Stay At Home.  Be Safe.  Have a lovely gardening weekend, wherever you are.

If you enjoy my 6 on Saturday you might like my wildlife/countryside blog too.  It’s accessible from the Core Edge Journal tab at the top of the blog.

Readers who are new to 6 – on – Saturday can join in easily – If you want to get a glimpse of lovely gardens from across the world, and chat to lots of lovely gardeners, then go here https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/  and join in!!

The O.G.

6 – on – Saturday 04.04.20

Here we are again, another Saturday, another 6.  I’m not going to mention the Thing.  We have spent nearly all day, every day in the garden this week.  It’s been a joy.

First up is are some softwood cutting from the Cistus from last week.  The bush is old and straggly and keeling over, so a  new start is necessary – in fact 6 new starts.  5 of them look good so I’m hopeful of a new clump.

Next is the first of this year’s sowings.  I am without a greenhouse at the new house (not sure how much longer I can go on calling it the new house and the new garden) so have waited until now.  Today have sown runner beans – I bought them loose at a show last year and now I have no idea what variety they are, and courgette Defender.  The courgette seeds are a bit old but we’ll see how many/if any germinate.  V boring pic to follow, runners on left, courgettes on right.

Third up is a peony of some sort.  It looks as though it’s going to be pink. The plant is quite tall and for some reason has been planted right against the house wall.

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And at number 4 is this darling clump of primroses, before the sparrows took off every single flower.  There are a few celandines in there as well as a dandelion or too.  I think that might be Crocosmia growing through it but we haven’t got around to clearing this bit yet, so I don’t know for sure.

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Next is this hen pheasant that has been visiting us all week.  Very cautious and very beautiful in an understated sort of way.  Not a great picture, looks like a headless pheasant – but there she is, on the fence under the Pittosporum.  That’s the trunk of the pittosporum to the left – it’s a monster!

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And last, is this pair of socks which though not ‘of’ the garden, was completed ‘in’ the garden last week.  In fact, whilst sitting in the garden shed.  And I’m wearing them today!

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So, that’s my six for this week.  Hope you are all keeping well.  And remember – Wash Your Hands.  Practise Social Distancing.  Stay At Home.  Be Safe.  Have a lovely gardening weekend, wherever you are.

If you enjoy my 6 on Saturday you might like my wildlife/countryside blog too.  It’s accessible from the Core Edge Journal tab at the top of the blog.

Readers who are new to 6 – on – Saturday can join in easily – If you want to get a glimpse of lovely gardens from across the world, and chat to lots of lovely gardeners, then go here https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/  and join in!!

The O.G.

6 – on – Saturday 28.03.20

Good morning all.  What a week this has been – lovely warm sunshine, a real feeling of spring, and the first week of staying at home in pretty serious terms.  But let’s stick with the garden and six things in it today.

Number One is this vibrant, in-your-face Cistus.  Just coming into flower, although there has been the odd bloom all through the winter, it’s a very old shrub and is looking frail.  Yesterday I took a few softwood cuttings to see if I can get some new plants out of it.

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Number Two are 36 red geraniums.  They arrived in the post on Friday, the teeniest, tiniest plug plants you have ever seen.  Potted up straight away, three to a pot, I hope they will grow away and provide a bit of colour this season and a lot more colour next season.

Number Three is a periwinkle (Vinca).  In such bright sunlight it looks quite pale but it is, in fact, a lovely mid-blue with gorgeous whirly, windmill-like petals.  It can be quite invasive so I’m keeping my eye on it, but it’s doing a lovely job of underplanting a Choisyia at the moment.

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Number Four is that rose bed I spoke about last week.  Cleared, roots removed, soil renewed and manured, new roses planted.  Now I know you should never plant roses where roses have been before, but I’ve worked hard on this bed and I’m hoping they will be OK.  They’ve gone into big planting holes with mycorrhizal pellets and backfilled with a mix of compost and well-rotted manure.  Over the weekend they’ll get a feed too.  Oh, and there some bluebells in that bed too.  I took them out…and I put them back in.

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Number 5 are violets.  No more needs to be said.  Tiny and perfectly beautiful.

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And finally, here is the Amelanchier, just beginning to open its hundreds of starry, white flowers in the sun with the cloudless blue sky behind.  Tonight the clocks will go forward and it really will be spring.

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And remember, folks – Wash Your Hands.  Practise Social Distancing.  Stay At Home.  Be Safe.  Have a lovely gardening weekend, wherever you are.

If you enjoy my 6 on Saturday you might like my wildlife/countryside blog too.  It’s accessible from the Core Edge Journal tab at the top of the blog.

Readers who are new to 6 – on – Saturday can join in easily – If you want to get a glimpse of lovely gardens from across the world, and chat to lots of lovely gardeners, then go here https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/  and join in!!

The O.G.

6 – on – Saturday 21.3.2020

‘Morning everyone.  Sunny here, but a darned cold, strong easterly wind blowing, so it’s a bit chilly.  Anyhow, not too chilly to get 6 pictures for you, but too chilly for this old girl to spend much time in the garden.

First up: the David Austin roses I succumbed to, not long after I saw that the ‘Gator had bought some last week.  From left to right – Gertrude Jekyll, Albertine, and 3 Munstead Wood.  They should get into bed early next week.  That’s a whacking great agapanthus behind right.  Leaves all through winter.

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Next: These muscari.  I have included them because they have seeded themselves opportunistically all over the garden.  These are between flower bed and paving stones in the front garden and they are are also all along the hedge bottom and in cracks in the paving.  So much nicer than planted in a clump in what – at this time of year – is an empty looking expanse of bare soil.  More joyful, somehow.

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Number three is new growth on the apple tree.  It’s still in its pot from when we moved last year but I’m hoping to get it in the ground soon.  At least it has survived!  It’s Red Windsor.

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Here is a clematis that badly needs tying up.  I’ve no idea what it is.  It was brown and crisp when we moved in last autumn and I cut it back to soil level in the winter.  I’m pleased to say it’s growing away quite vigorously and I just need to give it a bit of support until it reaches the trellis attached to the front of the house.

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Remember when I asked if anyone could identify this foliage?  They’re teeny tiny species tulips.  Sorry for the poor pic but it’s scarcely getting its head above ground.  If they all flower it should be a mass of bright red soon.  You’ll get a pic!

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Finally, these lovely anemones.  They came free with my spring bulb order from Bloms last autumn.  I just pushed them into a bit of spare soil outside the kitchen window and voilà – up they came.  Isn’t nature wonderful?

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So that’s my six for today.  We’ve had the equinox – it’s officially spring!

And remember, folks – Wash Your Hands.  Practise Social Distancing.  Stay At Home.  Be Safe.  Have a cheerful, sunshiny weekend, wherever you are.

If you enjoy my 6 on Saturday you might like my wildlife/countryside blog too.  It’s accessible from the Core Edge Journal tab at the top of the blog.

Readers who are new to 6 – on – Saturday can join in easily – If you want to get a glimpse of lovely gardens from across the world, and chat to lots of lovely gardeners, then go here https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/  and join in!!

The O. G.